Feb 3, 2013

Winter of Aleppo, a life under bombs

egyptindependent.tumblr.com/

By: Virginie Nguyen

Aleppo December 2012 — Winter has started, it’s 4.30 pm and the darkness of the street appears among the drops of water and the little light coming from the cars. In the street, noises and screams can be heard from the bakeries. Under the rain, hundreds of people, mainly men and children, are lining up for bread. They have been waiting there for hours and will wait until late at night. The civil war has been going on for 21 months now, and it is the second winter that the population has had to endure. With 60 000 people dead (according to the UN) since the beginning of the uprising, more and more Syrians civilians are leaving their homes to find safer places inside Syria or in the neighboring countries such as Turkey, Jordan or Lebanon. For those inside Syria, living conditions are getting worse due to the lack of electricity, increasing prices of basic needs and the cold … but whatever the difficulties are, life is still going on.





As fighting in Syria’s largest city, Aleppo, enters its sixth month, the economy has ground to a halt. There is no electricity, and the prices of basic goods such as bread and cooking oil have skyrocketed. Residents are selling off their possessions to survive. Here is a view of the neighborhood near the Aleppo airport, where heavy fighting was still going on.



People line up and struggle in front of a bakery in Aleppo. For a week, there has a severe shortage of bread. The price of 1 kilogram has become 12 times more expensive than it used to be. Outside the bakery, 1 kilogram of bread will cost 200 Syrian pounds, and at the bakery, it will cost 25 Syrian pounds.



The entrance of the courtyard in the Old Aleppo, which was considered a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is now completely destroyed.



Two small children share a meal inside an Aleppo school now used as their home. There hasn’t been any electricity for two weeks. Their parents, 23 and 25 years old, left the city of Karm al-Tarrab when their house was destroyed by MiG aircraft when none of them were inside. They decided to live in a school with 11 other families. As it is now winter, they have to struggle to find water, bread and petrol for electricity. Ahmed has found a small job as a plastic collector, but never earns more than 100 Syrian pounds a day.



Each time it rains, water leaks from the roof of a school where six different refugee families are living.



A family of five in the village of Marea, in northern Aleppo, is living in only one small room, as their house has been destroyed by a MiG.



Teenagers observe a rocket coming from a tank of the regular army. The Free Syrian Army brought it to their father, who used to repair weapons and bombs.



Syrian civilians from the village of Azaz, northern Aleppo, cut wood in order to make a fire. For one month, they haven’t had access to electricity.



Ahmed al-Omar is 25 and has two children. Five months ago, he and his wife and two children left the city of Karm al-Tarrab when their house was destroyed by a MiG, when none of them were inside. They decided to live in a school with eleven other families. It is now winter, so they struggle to find water, bread and petrol for electricity. Ahmed has found a small job a plastic collector, but never earns more than 100 Syrian pounds a day.



School has started again in some mosques or makeshift rooms in villages around Aleppo, such as Azaz, Tarafat or Marea. School takes place in the morning for boys and in the afternoon for girls. Local civilian councils organized the classes.



At a Friday protest in Bustan al-Kaser, Aleppo, young people and children sing songs against President Bashar al-Assad and the Syrian regime.



The body of a martyr is carried by members of his family during the Friday protest in Bustan al-Kaser, Aleppo.



On 20 December, a war aircraft targeted and bombed an ambulance in southern Aleppo, killing two people.

No comments:

Post a Comment